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to join her. and how they use the network is the use of the connect feature to send messages. her daughter can send messages to everybody in the network letting them know how she is doing. they used to the calendar to schedule appointments and organize rides. they use the shared tasks and goals to organize larger events. for example, when joe was released from the hospital, she was unable to get back into her home because she could not get up the stairs anymore. they used the network to build her a ramp on saturday afternoon. they use files to share information about her and a place where she keeps her personal information. she has advanced directives, medical records, and so on that is not accessible to everybody in the network, but some of the members. there are stories and photos, a place where people can celebrate today, how to share memories, have the good times that were the essence in the past and in the present. you might be asking yourself this question, if you are a facebook user, how is different from facebook. it is what we called open social networking, and it is designed to c
they used the network to build her a ramp on saturday afternoon. they use files to share information about her and a place where she keeps her personal information. she has advanced directives, medical records, and so on that is not accessible to everybody in the network, but some of the members. there are stories and photos, a place where people can celebrate today, how to share memories, have the good times that were the essence in the past and in the present. you might be asking yourself this question, if you are a facebook user, how is different from facebook. it is what we called open social networking, and it is designed to create many relationships. this is closed and personal, it is an intimate space. i have a daughter that was close to 1000 facebook friends. it has no advertisements. no data mining, it is private and secure. it bridges the formal and informal world of care and support. and what we have discovered is that people that use a, what they get out of that is what we call the network of fact. we have jill in the center of the network and you can see on t
that use a, what they get out of that is what we call the network of fact. we have jill in the center of the network and you can see on the upper side where you have a health care provider to put information into her fault about her health care. if you have heard daughter using the mobile application to update people on the go. you have the neighbor that tax the schedule to see when he is going shopping -- this is an illustration of a network of fact or network model of the good life. the neighbor says, always check on line to see what joe needs. the physician's assistant says it is easy to share the test results. the personal care worker says i've posted on the loose handrail and they handled it right away. her sister says, i am part of a team now, what a relief. out of this idea of the network of fact, one is that this is what joe wants. this is her key to a good life. her network is actually her gateway to a good life and her ability to stay home. and we will launch a touch screen interface for those that want to connect through video. i want to share with you a few things that use
for people? there is something that makes us hesitant to reach out to others. some of us can take this idea of independence to an extreme. i think this is probably some place in newfoundland, a remote shore of canada. we have come to believe that reaching out to others is a sign of weakness. was he asking for help and support as a vulnerability instead of a necessary strength. so if you agree with me that connections are the key to a good life, i would like you to explore with me how technology, and in particular, how that works can actually help. i would like to tell you about ties in the online network service. that is installed on every b-top computer in san francisco. this knowledge built on 20 years of connections to secure the future. it creates personal, private, secure online networks. here is what happened personal network looks like. and joe and her daughter created a network together, and what they did, they created a network in part because guildhall has an advance in her experience with cancer, and they wanted to coordinate the care and the connections and bring people closer t
had to learn. in the senior center where she lives, she said the most commonly used assisted technology is a two-inch-long piece of black ls will take, used to cover the flashing light on the vcr and the dvd player -- black electrical tape. she says it is easier the learning to program the clock. for the most part, a lot of seniors to not trust technology. people have gotten the word that there are risks to using technology, and a lot of seniors want to stay away from it. as much as i want to get my mother to do online banking and paying her bills, never going to happen. she is never going to do that. at the center for accessible technology, we work to understand the mindset of our clients, and as a result, we have systems in place of how we work with them. one of the things we do is we asked people -- what do you want to use a computer for? i cannot tell you how many people tell us they have never been asked that. they have been told they need to use a computer, but no one has told the what they need it for. sometimes we hear that people do not have anything they want to use
sure what is considered an adequate or three a project directive. maybe this training will help us understand that. also, it is helpful anyway. >> perhaps we can discuss the benefits. i will definitely appreciate it. >> good afternoon, commissioners. i will share a few items with you regarding yesterday's historic preservation commission hearing. the commission will meet only one time this month because of the july 4 holiday. yesterday, they reviewed and unanimously approved an expansion and rehabilitation of the contributing building to the market in the conservation district. the planning commission will review the entitlement associated with this project. the commission also completed its review of the entitlements for the veterans, the memorial complex across the street. there were two components to the review. the exteriors of the building is landmarked. the interior is not included, but the designating the ordinance requires to provide review and comment to the board of trustees of any major alterations that occurred to the interior spaces. after about an hour of public testi
in place of how we work with them. one of the things we do is we asked people -- what do you want to use a computer for? i cannot tell you how many people tell us they have never been asked that. they have been told they need to use a computer, but no one has told the what they need it for. sometimes we hear that people do not have anything they want to use it for, but a lot of times, they have something in particular. we tried to focus on something that will give them early success. so they are going to be able to have some success with the computer. if someone wants to be able to e-mail their grandchildren so they can get pictures of their grandkids, they will be motivated to push past their technology fear for that. at least i keep telling my mother that. but we also have to recognize that one of the things that happens is people come in who have been using technology, and they have their own systems for use in it, and we let them. we do not try to change how people are using it. an example of that is my grandmother. she was a wonderful baker. i miss her, but i miss her baked goods mo
in who have been using technology, and they have their own systems for use in it, and we let them. we do not try to change how people are using it. an example of that is my grandmother. she was a wonderful baker. i miss her, but i miss her baked goods more. she never had used a still in the old country that had thermostat. she would turn the stove on all the way to broil, and it would heat up like a furnace, and then she would turn it off, and then put her stuff in and cook it. if it got too cold, she would turn it on again. it drove my parents crazy, but she made wonderful food. she was never going to learn this technology, but she had adapted to it. we recognize that people do that. if people have something that works, you leave it alone. another issue that people have on computers is -- and it is a real frustration for a lot of seniors -- that things do not show up in the same place. we try to set up people's computers so that it is recognizable. if you are using a macintosh, and it has the dock that has all the controls on it, you set it up so that it is always visible. you put the i
to the ordinance. introducing a policy credits program and extending for institutional uses, retaining the frame for inactive uses, providing collection and appeal authority in certain cases and clarifying the use of the application for the provision. we are recommending introducing a program, and just as a reminder, there is a policy credit proposed. there is assisting ability fee revenue to fund the credit program. it is intended to encourage and help meet certain policy objectives of the city. it would allow certain projects to be waived or reduced fees under the program. the categories of program eligible for this credit includes non form of retail and vacant space. those less than the maximum amount of parking, the affordable housing projects and small residential projects designed are those with 20 units or less. the credits would be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. the board has generally supported the concept of a policy credits program. they did establish a cap, they felt it was important to recognize the development project has an impact on the transportation system as a
. -- feedback cards. i would love to hear it in e-mail form or you can call me. please use the entertainment commission as a resource, but be nice. you saw all of us today. we are here to help you if we can. we do have to issue some permits that those of you -- that somebody do not like, but there is. thank you. >> welcome to "culturewire." today we are at recology. they are celebrate 20 years of one of the most incredibly unique artist residency programs. we are here to learn more from one of the resident artists. welcome to the show, deborah. tell us how this program began 20 years ago. >> the program began 20 years ago. our founder was an environmentalist and an activist and an artist in the 1970's. she started these street sweeping campaigns in the city. she started with kids. they had an exhibition at city hall. city officials heard about her efforts and they invited her to this facility. we thought it would coincide with our efforts to get folks to recycle, it is a great educational tool. since then, we have had 95 professional artists come through. >> how has the program changed over
fourth floor looking out the window with his camera. took a picture, looked at it, send it to us, we had it on the air and a couple of minutes. because of technology, because of things changing so rapidly. it is a brand new world. vicki, thank you for the importance of that network and everything else. thank you. next, i want to introduce you to a gentleman. he is tall, dark, handsome. sorry, that was me. wrong script. [laughter] you, too, right? it's your birthday, right? ok. in all seriousness, a gentleman by the name of dmitri is here. i want you to meet him. his name is dmitri belzer. he has worked in the disability community for years providing technology access for more than 30 years. trained as a sign language expert and interpreter, he established a death services program ast san francisco state university, provided support services for colleges. we don't call them disabled. they happen to have a disability. he joined pacific bell, helped organize honda the advisory group for people that happen to have a disability. he gave them put to that company on how to develop featu
or reach out to us on facebook or twitter and we >> good morning, everybody. welcome to the technology summit. we are looking forward to a fantastic day. we are going to start with a demonstration of the wii system. it is an interactive gaming system that allows people to play different activities and participate in different fitness activities together. a lot of wii systems, about 40, are being deployed around the city to different senior centers and residents facilities to encourage older adults to get more involved with physical activity using technology. we're going to spend the first 30 minutes or so demonstrating the wii. not only will we demonstrate how to use it, but we will doe demonstrate adaptive devices so that it can be an inclusive activity for all adults and children. my name is dr. chris thompson from the university of san francisco. go, dons. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the s
at 911 is appropriate, use 553-0123. i did not know that. that is a direct line where you can get an ambulance. we also talked about -- the commander talked about -- your relationship with your police officer. the captain said he intends to start a monthly meeting with the nightclub owners at the station. he does not want security. he wants to meet with the owners of the night clubs once a month. that is a fantastic idea. i want to plug that around to all of the stations, certainly the ones that have a number of night clubs in their area, so that that can become a routine relationship. if a capt. changes, which happens all the time, that can also continue, regardless of what capt. is there. those were the big ones. some discussion about risk-reward in using promoters. there was the resolution to this issue but it is something that you should leave here thinking about. some people chimed in to say that there is not a dime that they would not bother turning using a promoter if they thought there was some risk involved in that. obviously, other people feel differently. that risk- rew
earthquake. we do have a grandson? she was with us in 2009. goopublic works is here. this reminds us of the 3000 people but passed away in 1906 from the devastating earthquake, but the rebirth of our city is with us. i have been in all of these other positions where we are always prepared. and we are already engaged in recovery efforts. we were there with a whole staff. we have six we assure you that when the next big event happens, that water system will be there for us to deliver water with that 24 hours. a huge change from depending on this fountain. we are handing it off to generations of youth in the city to understand -- make sure they're prepared. go to our website, it tells you all the things there. iti is about having those items prepared.w we will survive. that is how we get ready and celebrate and honor the people who left us and make sure our city is ready. thank you for being here. congratulations to our survivors. >> very nice job. behind me is a good friend and a great firechief. you go back 106 years. braxton morning. -- good morning. one of the survivors could not be
you enjoy the great opening act? thank you so much for joining us tonight for san francisco's asian pacific heritage celebration. yes. and that is giving u.s. side of things to come, but i want to tell you what about the opening performance that you saw. it was proudly presented by the american center for the philippine arts, and it means a "from the village of." it is alive journey of the man struggling with the responsibility. the untapped and dynamism of the folk dance. it was created by the choreographer and performed by san francisco dance artists jonathan mercado, henry lau, maritoni madrano and kimberly requesto. give them an opening applause for that act. [applause] as for this group here, we request that you stand for the singing of the national anthem. >> ♪ oh, say can you see by the dawn's early light what so proudly we hail at the twilight's last gleaming ♪ ♪ who's broad stripes and bright stars through theh perilous fight o'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming? ♪ ♪ and the rockets' red glare the bombs bursting in air gave proof through the ni
of san francisco. the hospital will use an estimated 20% less energy, 40% less water than regular buildings around san francisco. it will be a rooftop garden. we have light-reflecting roofing material. this is not only for the patients and there families, but to reduce the like which keeps our city cooler. we will use 30% less water to keep the hospital looking green. with today's economy, the part of the project we are most proud of is mayor lee has made it his main goal, but is creating jobs. we have over 140 local enterprise contractors involved with the project. it will be awarded at over $59 million. the project overall is tracking 30%, and with our contracts, that is at 41%. [applause] this partnership has also successfully placed graduates into the various jobs including bricklayers and ironworkers. a lot of jobs happy to be here. and finally, our collaboration exemplifies the vision. is started with mayor lee. a big hand for our former director. we partner with the community and the city family. and here today, we do the best job we can. i want to thank you all for having
. before you is a request for a conditional use authorization under planning sections to allow un new automotive repair shop within an existing vacant commercial building. the proposal is to relocate from its current location the 23730 mission street. the existing building will not be expanded. the ground floor will be used for auto repair activities and office uses, accessory to the business. the back rooms will be used for painting. the mezzanine will be used for storage and a break area. the new location will allow the owner to install new equipment and provide for new jobs for the community. the proposal is the relocation of existing automotive repair shop and existing building -- the existing building has been in that location since 1977. this is an independent news and locally owned which has been encouraged. historically the previous uses on the side have been similar uses with compatible impact. staff has received contracts from three neighbors concerned about noise and odor. since the packets were distributed, we received one e- mail from a neighbor with similar concerns i ha
using technology. we're going to spend the first 30 minutes or so demonstrating the wii. not only will we demonstrate how to use it, but we will doe demonstrate adaptive devices so that it can be an inclusive activity for all adults and children. my name is dr. chris thompson from the university of san francisco. go, dons. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we use this little remote. just by moving our arms, we can control movement on the sc
assumptions, we have used 11-12 figures for our eda. >> that is correct. >> you have captured it. >> it is captured for a certain extent. if we do increase our ada in 12-13, we will see proportional increase in our revenues. we still very much want to keep trying our hardest both for programmatic, academic, and financial reasons to increase our ada and chronic absenteeism and truancy. >> in a way we have accounted for. -- for it. commissioner mendoza: i enjoyed being president more than i enjoy being the chair of the budget committee. so just -- there is not a lot to be said about this. it is in circles and we try to do the best we can with what little we have. i would be remiss if we did not think the city or be thankful we are in san francisco -- thank the city or be thankful we are in san francisco. our residents and voters continue to support the school district in many ways. i also want to thank the board of supervisors and the mayor for releasing the rainy day funds which are pretty much depleted. the first year we got rainy day funds, we got $24 million in this year we got
-reward in using promoters. there was the resolution to this issue but it is something that you should leave here thinking about. some people chimed in to say that there is not a dime that they would not bother turning using a promoter if they thought there was some risk involved in that. obviously, other people feel differently. that risk- reward ratio is something that you need to think seriously about if you are going to continue to use promoters at your venue. at this point, certainly take some questions. if you are done, it is 10:04. i appreciate you all coming. we have the bac cards. -- feedback cards. i would love to hear it in e-mail form or you can call me. please use the entertainment commission as a resource, but be nice. you saw all of us today. we are here to help you if we can. we do have to issue some permits that those of you -- that somebody do not like, but there is. thank you. >> good morning, everybody. welcome to the technology summit. we are looking forward to a fantastic day. we are going to start with a demonstration of the wii system. it is an interactive gaming system th
uses a son that doesn't speak to teach me so many things all day every day. i rarely talk about that because if it hits to the core of may. and that is why i have learned the necessary needs of technology whto learn and to grw at to do things. and why you and i need the things you're going to hear in just a couple of minutes. i just want to take a quick moment as you get settled. you will have to stop talking because i will not talk over you. you, too. i'm going to count to ten. i usually don't have to finish to ten. when you think of technology in the world today, we can't even imagine what is going to have the month from now. think of the things that have been eaten up. we used to have payphones. they are gone. the cellphone 8 it up. the cellphone 8 of the camera industry. you don't need to buy a camera. the cellphone 8 the watch industry. i don't even wear a watch. you can go through the list. he you don't have to go to the bank anymore. take a picture of a check and make a deposit. look at all the things that we have changed. and change every day. if we can't imagine what is
and a dancing together across every conceivable and imaginable difference. i have believed the world looks to us to say it is -- if it is possible to live together across every conceivable difference. we're proud of our home and place in history and proud of our example. but we also are humble in the context of the world we're living in. a world that is another connected but hyper-connected with a merger of i.t. and globalization. we recognize our faith -- fate is connected to the fate of others. that is the spirit that binds us together. the spirit that brings us here today. i want to close by reminding you that california is the birthplace as mayor lee was saying of life science, biotech, the home of the california stem cell institute, a state with more engineers, more scientists, more global -- nobel laureate's than any other state or we still lay claim to five of the top universities based on the shanghai index in the world. caltech, stanford university, and three of our public universities, not least of which the university is a stone's throw away. uc-berkeley campus. we're proud of the sta
. kerber there will be opportunity for us to as pieces of the questions about the law off and we will have thought your briefing. i will have this played a little bit more heavily to the facts. >> we would deliver our arguments, then follow up question in. with this fifa on the facts of aloft? >> yes. if -- would this be on the facts of the law? >> yes. >> does that plan sound acceptable to the commission? anything else from the parties. >> know. >> okay then, the meeting is adjourned. >> good morning, everybody. welcome to the technology summit. we are looking forward to a fantastic day. we are going to start with a demonstration of the wii system. it is an interactive gaming system that allows people to play different activities and participate in different fitness activities together. a lot of wii systems, about 40, are being deployed around the city to different senior centers and residents facilities to encourage older adults to get more involved with physical activity using technology. we're going to spend the first 30 minutes or so demonstrating the wii. not only will we demonstrate
mayor, will you join us for a photograph, please? >> thank you very much, ladies and gentlemen. one more round of applause. [applause] if you look around you tonight, you will see poster board. celebrating, acknowledging, the first asian americans. we have the first asian-american actress in hollywood. the first asian-american nba player. the first members of congress. these interns are the future of our community. they are the reason why we are here today. we're also here to celebrate and recognize one of the greatest members of our community. this year it is the first year we are giving the lifetime achievement award. the lifetime achievement award this year is going to secretary norman manetta. he is a trailblazer. a man who paved the way for many of us. he was the first asian-american mayor of a major city. he was elected to congress 10 times. he was the first person to serve two presidents in a cabinet. first as secretary of commerce to president clinton, secretary of transportation to president bush. it was on 9/11 that secretary mineta showed us what he was made of. he made t
difference to us. it is just really helpful. when we come in here, it is under pressure. also, the out -- may not get beyond a few people. the notification and so on. so i really look forward to this. commissioner wu: thank you. any further public comment? seeing none, public comment is closed. commissioner miguel: i would like to compliment joanna nad claudio -- and claudia for the work you have done so far. i have had some engagement over the last year's with the department. i conducted two noontime forums for them on basically answering questions, and they seemed very receptive and understood the principles that were involved. what i have a slight problem with is not your power point presentation -- although, please do not read slides word for word. i am finding in one section community stakeholders. then i am seeing residents and businesses. then public. then department stakeholders. by the way, stakeholders never divide. i think you are talking about the same people, but you are using all different terms, and that does not make sense to me. then i see under the statement of purpose down
, it is something that we have talked about. it is important for us to understand what the cbos are doing. it is important for them to have specific training for their individuals. they should also have some guidelines and some criteria to evaluate their successes, on a quarterly and yearly basis. >> thank you. last question. what are the types of job opportunities that are available for at risk youth? what are the funding opportunities? >> there are not many job opportunities right now. with the way that funding is currently, it is only being reduced. what we try to do is think creative. we try to create an internship programs, where we try to confuse -- infuse youth. we utilize a lot of non-western ways of trying to have youth identified. we infuse political education so they can make a good choice. there are other programs like oasis. there are not many opportunities, not everybody could work -- all the work permits required. it also requires a social security number. alternative pathways are a good way to go, such as those internship opportunities. use these venues as an opportunity t
person or a white person. it is about all of us, or none of us, and that is the bottom line. it has to be that mentality. >> it is a way to control the prisoners. it takes the pressure off the guards and everybody else. they say we want to stop violence, but you promote a violence by segregating. when an individual comes, the first in the asking, where are you from? what is your nationality? that is how to divide and conquer. that is the way the united states is made up. that is how you work. north and south vietnam, for instance. they divide people so that the pressure will not be on them. that is how i see the system. i see it in prison, how they divide inmates. it is scary if inmates unite, and they do not like that. when i first come to prison, it will be a big thing if i went and sat with the blacks. it would be a big think if they caucasian sat with the asians. we only did that one time, where everybody got together, and we got what we wanted. when you unite, you can conquer. [applause] >> next question is for the commander. how can they community-based organization contact th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,201 (some duplicates have been removed)

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